Hericium coralloides

Hericium coralloides

 [Commonly accepted name but not all users have been in agreement with one another as to what they mean by it. Some workers now drop it.]

Abies alba 

Abies spp.

Acacia dealbata 

Acacia melanoxylon 

Acacia spp. 

Acer platanoides

Acer spp.

Agathis australis 

Alnus glutinosa 

Alnus incana

Alnus spp.

Archontophoenix cunninghamii

Argyrodendron actinophyllum

Beilschmiedia tawa

Betula alba

Betula papyrifera

Betula pendula

Betula spp.

Carpinus betulus 

Carpinus spp.

Carya spp.

Corylus sp.

Dacrydium cupressinum 

Eucalyptus campanulata

Eucalyptus regnans

Eucalyptus spp.

Fagus orientalis

Fagus spp.

Fagus sylvatica

Fuscospora fusca [formerly Nothofagus fusca]

Fraxinus excelsior

Fraxinus spp. 

Juglans sp.

Knightia excelsa

Metrosideros robusta 

Morus spp.

Nothofagus cunninghamii [now = Lophozonia cunninghamii ]

Nothofagus menziesii [now = Lophozonia menziesii]

Nothofagus solandri [now = Fuscospora solandri]

A Nothofagus species. Either N. solandri or N. truncata [the latter now = Fuscospora truncata]

Nothofagus spp.

Notholithocarpus densifolia 

Nyssa sylvatica

Picea abies

Picea glauca

Picea spp. 

Pinus sylvestris 

Populus balsamifera

Populus spp.

Populus tacamahaca

Populus tremula

Populus tremuloides

Populus trichocarpa

Pyrus sp.

Quercus cerris

Quercus coccifera

Quercus dilata

Quercus garryana

Quercus leucotrichophora 

Quercus pubescens

Quercus robur [now = Quercus pedunculata]

Salix spp.

Sloanea woollsii

Sophora japonica [now = Styphnolobium japonicum]

Sorbus aucuparia

Tilia cordata

Tilia spp.

Tsuga heterophylla

Ulmus spp.

Weinmannia racemosa 

Also reported to be found growing on:

  an unidentified tree-fern frond (VIC)

  an unidentified podocarp (NZ)

  a Ganoderma fruiting body (NZ) (?)

N.B. (with caution)

the claims for:

  Deciduous trees only.

  Conifers only.

“exclusively on deciduous wood” Harrison 1973 (as H. ramosum).

“grows only on deciduous wood, usually poplar.” Henderson 1981. 

in northwestern Europe […] grows almost exclusively on hardwoods.” Kotiranta & Niemelä 1988.

Exclusively on softwood. Maas Geesteranus 1959.

In the list that follows, hardwoods will be seen to predominate. Softer wood species will also be noticed. 

Hericium coralloides reported as occurring on Abies, Picea, Tsuga and other softwoods merit a closer examination to establish if these were  misidentifications or simply less common occurrences. 

Abies alba (silver fir) Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus); Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (Czech Republic & Yugoslavia). [Ed.: was this H. alpestre?]

Abies sp. (fir) ATCC (Yugoslavia). [Ed.: was this H. alpestre?]; Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing Teng 1996 (China); Jussieu ex Barrelier 1714:118 (as Fungus ramosus] and also Micheli 1720:122 (Italy).

Acacia dealbata (silver wattle) “dead log” ALA (Victoria, Australia).

Acacia melanoxylon (blackwood) “Blackwood stump, with leaves growing from the stump” ALA (Tasmania, Australia); “Fern gully […] on standing dead”, “a gully […] inhabiting a rotten, fallen blackwood”, “in a fissure in trunk”, “on stump” ALA (Victoria, Australia).

Acacia spp. (wattles) “fallen wattle tree” ALA (Tasmania, Australia); “fallen log (hanging from)” ALA (New Zealand); “On rotting Acacia log” ALA (Victoria, Australia).

Acer platanoides (Norway maple) Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus). 

Acer sp. (maple) or Fagus sp. (beech) Ginns 1984 (Virginia).

Agathis australis (kauri) “fallen log” This is a conifer. ALA (6 finds from New Zealand: all were submitted as Hericium sp.)

Alnus glutinosa (common alder) “fallen wood” Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus).

Alnus incana (grey alder) Safonov 2014 (Orenburg Oblast, Russia).

Alnus sp. (alder) was mentioned as a host in Harrison 1973 (Oregon).

Archontophoenix cunninghamii (Bangalow palm) “Host in contact with soil, fallen, dead, rotten [trunk]” ALA (Queensland, Australia).

Argyrodendron actinophyllum (black booyong) “Dead wood from fallen” ALA (Queensland, Australia).

Beilschmiedia tawa (tawa) “standing dead stump”, “wood”, “large fallen rotting log” ALA (New Zealand).

Betula alba (silver birch) Ginns 1985 (Sweden).

Betula papyrifera (white birch) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada).

Betula papyrifera (white birch) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as = H. laciniatum).

Betula pendula (white birch) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing Astapenko & Kutafyeva 1990 (Russia). (as = H. clathroides)

Betula spp. (birch) rotting” Ginns 1985; also “windfall” Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (Serpukhov District, Russia);  Cybertruffle’s Robigalia (4 collections in Russia); “dead unfallen”, “on stump” Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus).

Carpinus betulus (common hornbeam) Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus).

Carpinus sp. (hornbeam) or Fagus sp. (beech) Ginns 1984 (UK).

Carya sp. (hickory) “grows from dead wood” “on a dead hickory” Coker 1918 (North Carolina, USA) (as Manina flagellum).

Corylus sp. (hazelnut) Koski-Kotiranta & Niemelä 1988 (Central Europe).

Dacrydium cupressinum (rimu) “well rotted podocarp” ALA (New Zealand). This is a conifer.

Eucalyptus campanulata (New England blackbutt) “under” ALA (Queensland, Australia).

Eucalyptus regnans (mountain ash) “Inside a hollow of a mountain ash tree”, “riparian vegetation […] on top of fallen rotting log [host ID questioned]”, ‘on mountain ash trunk” “seen at two locations” ALA (Victoria, Australia).

Eucalyptus spp. (gum trees) “On dead fallen Eucalypt”, “Living Eucalyptus species” ALA (Victoria, Australia); “living eucalypts”, “on living eucalypt”, “base of eucalyptus tree” ALA (Tasmania, Australia).  [1 possibly E. obliqua]

Fagus orientalis (oriental beech) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia (unclear if Georgia or Ukraine) [as = H. alpestre forma caput-ursi]; also mentioned in Doğan et alia 2005 (Turkey) See comments below.

Fagus sp.: “stump” Lacheva 2014 (Bulgaria); Micheli 1720:122 (Italy); Bourdot & Galzin 1927 (France) Ginns 1985 (Denmark); Hallenberg 1983 (Denmark, France, Sweden, Yugoslavia); Abrego et alia 2017; Domanski et alia 1960 (Poland); Harrison 1961 (Nova Scotia) (as H. ramosum); “on trunks or logs, often on beech” Groves 1981 (Canada); preferred host given in Banker 1906 (USA & Canada; as H. laciniatum). Arnold 2001 proposed Hericium coralloides as an indicator species for undisturbed beech forests.

Fagus sylvatica (European beech) ATCC (Denmark); Bisko et alia 2016 (near Nijmegen, Netherlands); Boddy et alia 2011 (UK); Stalpers 1992 (Ostrava, Czechoslovakia); “on old trees” (as H. ramosum) Domański et alia 1960 (on the slope of Szeroka Wierch, SE Poland); Cybertruffle’s Robigalia (7 records from Ukraine).

Fraxinus excelsior (European ash) Boddy et alia 2011 (UK); Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus); also mentioned at the Global Fungal Red List.

Fraxinus sp. (ash) Bourdot & Galzin 1927 (France); also mentioned in Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK); Cybertruffle’s Robigalia (1 record from Georgia).

Fuscispora fusca (red beech) “large old log” ALA (New Zealand).

Ganoderma (?) Reported to have occurred on a Ganoderma fruiting body. Most likely the perception of the Ganoderma being the actual host was not accurate. It seems more probable that they were sharing the same host and became intimately associated. Also reported associated on a single host with Ganoderma. ALA (NZ); H. coralloides was reported to have been found sharing the same host with Ganoderma and in one case this was noted as following it. ALA (Tasmania, Australia).

Juglans sp. (walnut) Bourdot & Galzin 1927 (France); Monica 2014 includes, as H. erinaceus, an image that appears to be H. coralloides (Italy).

Knightia excelsa (rewa-rewa)  A specimen from Colenso: Hooker 1867:611 (Hooker doubted the ID due to an ash-grey color but this is a color that can occur when old or infected with mold); “standing and fallen”, “fallen rotten wood” ALA (New Zealand).

Metrosideros robusta (northern rātā) ALA (New Zealand).

Morus sp. (mulberry) Bourdot & Galzin 1927 (France); also mentioned in Persoon 1794:151 “Quercum, etiam ad Fagos et Abietis, et in Italia ex Batarra […], in Ulmis et Morus provenit.”; Micheli 1720:122 (Italy). 

Nothofagus cunninghamii (myrtle beech) “dead”, “rotten trunk”, “on fallen branches”, “on tree” ALA (Victoria, Australia); “dead tree” ALA (Tasmania, Australia).

Nothofagus menziesii (silver beech) “well rotted standing dead wood”, “very wet rotted log” ALA (New Zealand).

Nothofagus solandri (black beech) “rotten wood” Atlas of Living Australia (New Zealand).

Nothofagus sp. (unclear if black or hard beech) (i.e. respectively Nothofagus solandri var. solandri or Nothofagus truncata) “rotten stump” ALA (New Zealand).

Nothofagus spp. (southern beeches) “dead tree”, “standing dead tree” , “dead stump”, “spotted on a damp tree stump” ALA (Victoria, Australia & New Zealand).

Notholithocarpus (formerly Lithocarpus) densifolia (tan-oak) Common on dropped limbs, fallen trunks, on dead standing trees, inside hollows (as both growth forms). Very rarely on the dead tissue of a large live tree.
Local observations by Trout (Mendocino Co. California, USA).

Nyssa sylvatica (tupelo) “on decayed log” Van Hook 1922 (Indiana, USA) (as Hydnum caput-ursi). [Ed.: was this H. americanum?]

Picea abies (Norway spruce) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing  Burova 1968:363. (1 record from Russia). [Ed.: was this H. alpestre?]

Picea glauca (white spruce) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum). [Ed.: was this H. abietis?]

Picea sp. (spruce) DAVFP (BC, Canada). [Ed.: was this H. abietis?]

Pinus sylvestris (scots pine) “on trunk of supposedly living” Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus). [Ed.: H. alpestre?]

Podocarpaceae (these are conifers). Not identified beyond family. “dead standing tree” ALA (New Zealand).

Populus alba (white poplar) Haller 1768 (Sweden) [as = Echinus ramosus]

Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Populus spp. Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba , Canada).

Populus sp. (poplar) DAVFP (BC, Canada); also Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada) and in BVN 2009 (Alberta, Canada) (as = H. ramosum); Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing  Safongy 1999:79. (1 record from Russia); Sterbeeck 1675:254-255 (Netherlands).

Populus tacamahaca (black cottonwood) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Populus tremula (quaking aspen) Ginns 1985 (Sweden); Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing  Astapenko 1990:290. (1 record from Russia) [as = H. clathroides].

Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada); also DAVFP (BC, Canada); also Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) DAVFP (BC, Canada) Most common host species in BC collections. Also Ginns 1985. DAVFP included a collection of “americanum” from BC, Canada on this substrate). It i s reasonable to suspect this was a coralloides.]

Quercus cerris (Turkey oak) “on coarse woody debris” Urban 2015 (Austria).

Quercus coccifera (kermes oak) Micheli 1720:122 (Italy).

Quercus dilata (tilonj) “on dead parts of trunk” Sultana & Qreshi 2007 (Pakistan) (as H. ramosum).

Quercus garryana (garry oak) DAVFP included a collection of “americanum” from BC, Canada on this substrate). It seems reasonable to suspect this was coralloides.]

Quercus leucotrichophora (banj oak) “trees and fallen wood” Karun & Sridhar 2016 citing Zutshi & Gupta 2013 (Jamma & Kashmir, India); “Dead tree” Karun & Sridhar 2016 citing Thind & Khara 1975 (Himchal Pradesh, India) [as = Q. incana]; Cybertruffle’s Robigalia  (India) [as = Q. incana].

Quercus petraea (sessile oak) Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus); Cybertruffle’s Robigalia  (Ukraine).

Quercus pubescens (downy oak) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia  (Ukraine).

Quercus robur (European oak) “on decaying trunk” Ginns 1985 (Sweden); “on fallen wood” Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus); ALA (Swrcow, Mahrisch-Weisskirchen, Czech Republic).

Salix sp. (willow) Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada).

Sloanea woollsii (yellow carabeen)  “Wood, stag buttress 250 cm diam. and roots” ALA (Queensland, Australia)

Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia  (2 records from Ukraine) [1 as = Hericium coralloides; the other as Hericium sp.].

Tilia cordata (little-leaf tilden) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing  Burova 1968:363. (Russia); Kotiranta & Niemelä 1988 (Europe).

Tilia sp. (tilden) mentioned in Russian Red Book Plants (Russian Federation).

Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock) DAVFP (BC, Canada). [Ed.: H. abietis?]

Ulnus spp. (elm) Bourdot & Galzin 1927 (France); also mentioned in Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK).

Weinmannia racemosa (kāmahi) ALA (New Zealand).

“Outside of Belarus [reported] from Populus, Salix [willow], Sorbus [mountain-ash], Tilia [tilden], and Ulmus [elm].” Yurchenko 2002.

“Inhabiting big-size fallen wood, dead unfallen trunks and large branches, stumps; sometimes […] in trunk holes” Yurchenko 2002 (Belarus)

“Large stems of hardwood, especially beech” Hansen & Veesterholt 2002 (Denmark).

“Fallen decayed trunks of Fagus sylvatica and other deciduous trees, and exceptionally on Abies” Hallenberg 1983 (Sweden) (as = H. clathroides).

“Standing dead trunks, fallen trunks and larger branches” Boddy et alia 2011 (UK).

“On angiosperm wood” Stalpers 1992 (Epping forest, England).

“Logs on ground. Mostly Beech, also on Fraxinus and Ulnus” Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK).

“Beech wood” Wald et alia 2004.

“Common in Iowa on dead logs of frondose species” Miller 1935. (Iowa) (as = Hericium laciniatum/coralloides).

“On beech and hickory logs” Banker 1906 (Canada and USA: NY to CA) (as = Hericium laciniatum/ramosum).

The most common host genus [in Scandinavia] is Betula (64.3%) [Norway 30%; central & northern Sweden 41.8% and Finland 75.2%], followed by Populus, predominately tremula, (18.1%) [Norway 40%; Sweden 23.6% and Finland 14.5%];
“In Denmark the commonest host tree is Fagus sylvatica, and only one find from Betula was reported by Knudsen and Pedersen (1984). The Norwegian hosts were Betula sp., Populus tremula and Sorbus aucuparia, in this order. In [southern] Sweden, 21.8% of the collections derived from Fagus sylvatica;
Collections also exist from Acer platanoides, Alnus sp., Populus tremula, Ulmus sp., Salix sp. and Tilia cordata. In two Swedish collections, Abies was indicated as the host, but samples of the wood were lacking and it was impossible to confirm the determination; these collections also represented H. coralloides in the present sense.” (Sweden);
Additional Scandinavian collections were reported on Acer platanoides, Alnus incana & Alnus glutinosa, Betula pubescens & Betula pendula, Populus balsamifera, Salix spp, Tilia cordata & Ulmus sp.;
These records indicate that in northwestern Europe H. coralloides grows almost exclusively on hardwoods;
“In Central Europe H. coralloides favours Fagus sylvatica, but has also been reported from the genera Betula, Carpinus, Corylus, Fraxinus, Juglans, Morus, Pyrus, Quercus and Ulmus.” 

Kotiranta & Niemelä 1988.

“Most commonly on Acer spp., frequent on Fagus and Betula, single collections on Ulmus, Carya, and Fraxinus. It is the only species seen on cottonwood and aspen (Populus spp.) in the west. Single collections on Alnus (Oregon) and live oak (California), and in Alaska on Betula and Populus.” Harrison 1973 (as Hericium ramosum).

“Grows on stumps and trunks of dead hardwoods, mainly birch, rarely beech, elm, alder, oak, linden [Tilia sp.], aspen […]” Russian Red Book Plants (Russian Federation).

“On decayed wood, fir, beech, &c.” Massee 1892 & Stevenson 1886 (England).

“Decayed log” ATCC (UK).

“Hardwood logs” Ostry et alia 2011.

“upon oak and other trees” Gray 1821:652 (UK).

“dans les fentes des vieux arbres et sur les vieilles poutres” [in the fissures of old trees and on old logs] Chevalier 1826:279 (France) (merges coralloides and ramosum). 

“on the oldest tree trunks, and mainly on oaks.” Letellier 1826.

“On la trouve sur plusieurs sortes d’arbres, sur-tout sur le chêne en France, en Italie & en Allemagne” Paulet 1793:427.

“Fruits from dead hardwood logs and stumps,” “Saprobic and possibly parasitic…typically fruiting from fallen hardwoods branches and stumps, but very rarely reported from the wounds of living hardwoods (perhaps as a result of misidentification)” Kuo website.

“Grows only on deciduous wood, usually poplar.” Henderson 1981.

“On hardwood logs” Mycoweb (California) (as H. ramosum).

“Grows on prostrate trunks of trees of various kinds.” Hyams 1900 (North Carolina, USA).

“Grows in damp areas on dead wood from native and introduced trees” (9:20), “on dead wood such as native and exotic logs and stumps.”  “normally found on damp decaying wood in sheltered locations.” (4:227) Hubregtse 2018 (Australia).

Substrates described as “dead stumps”, “large logs”, “fallen dead very rotten trunk” Atlas of Living Australia (Lists 39 records from NSW, Australia; many of which were submitted as H. clathroides.)

 “Permanent shade. […] along sides of very wet rainforest trunk on ground”. Substrates described as “on fallen tree leaning up slope”, “on rotting log on a sloping moist, shaded gully”, “on very dead, decorticated log”, “on dead fallen wood”, “on very rotten log”, “rotting stump”, “on dead wood of 6 metre high stump”, “in large tufts on old logs and may be gregarious”, “gregarious on large decaying log” ALA (Lists 34 records from Queensland, Australia; many submitted as H. clathroides.) 

“A large mass had formed low down on a living tree trunk, well below the track”. Substrates described as “tall dead trunk”, “upright tall dead trunk”, “on tree trunk”, “standing dead tree”, “near river in deep shade […] standing tree”, “large upright trunk”, “trunk of dead tree”, “on trunk of dead tree 1.5m above ground”, “near river in deep shade […] standing tree”, “wood, trunk”, “on underside of fallen branch of native tree”, “dead log (15cm diameter) which was in ground”, “on dead treefern frond […] not sure of identity”, “wet forest, base of dead standing tree” ALA (Lists 56 records from Victoria, Australia; many submitted as H. clathroides.). 

Reported from a variety of cool wet habitats in Tasmania: “Riverine rainforest”, “wet riverine environment”, “Cool temperate mixed forest. The myrtle side of the forest”, “In beech forest”, “Mixed cool temperate forest with Nothofagus cunninghamii and Eucalyptus obliqua”, “Eucalypt rainforest with Nothofagus, laurel, Pomaderris and satinwood”, “Mixed wet forest: Acacia melanoxylon, Nothofagus cunninghamii, Monotoca glauca”, “Mixed cool temperate forest with myrtle” “Cool temperate forest with Eucalyptus, myrtle, leatherwood and native laurel”, “Mixed myrtle, manferns, leatherwood, sassafras”, “wet forest with Sassafras”, , Reported in Huon pine / Nothofagus rainforest, in forests with Nothofagus predominating, commonly reported from “wet sclerophyll” habitat and in “cool temperate mixed forest, dominated by Nothofagus cunninghamii, manferns and sassafras”, “Site was logged many years ago”. Reported substrates were a familiar mix: “Large troup on rotting log”, “fallen log “, “standing dead tree”, “dead tree trunk”, “tree trunk”, “rotting stump”, “stump of a rotting tree”, “very rotten stump”, “tree buttress or stump”, “fallen to ground, decaying”, “magnificent display up entire dead tree trunk”, It was found on several living Eucalyptus. ALA (Lists 162 records from Tasmania, Australia).

Many reports from New Zealand’s beech forests. Substrates described as “dead wood”, “standing stump”, “rotten stump”, “dead trunk”, “rotting tree trunk”, “dead standing tree”, “fallen wood”, “large log”, “rotting log”, “rotten log”, “wet rotted log”, “very rotten log”, “decayed fallen log”, “hardwood log” (in broadleaf podocarp forest), “rotting bark on dead standing trunk”, “bark of living tree”, “tree” (no indication if live or dead). ALA (Lists 67 records from New Zealand; the vast majority as Hericium clathroides. Plus 8 additional records of the same as Hericium sp.). 

The reports from New Zealand and Australia need more study to establish if they represent one or two species. The very slender branched and long toothed specimens are quite striking by comparison to the rest. 

Colenso 1889 attempted to propose Hydnum novae-zealandiae as a new species; commenting that it was different in form from a single Hydnum laciniatum he had encountered some 40 years earlier. His newer specimen was collected from a Beilschmiedia tawa; which is not uncommonly represented as a host tree in the coralloides/laciniatum collections that are detailed at ALA. He included no illustration but his account is interesting in view of the other collection reports. Colenso considered these to be rare in New Zealand. It might be wondered if the increase of reports in subsequent years was more heavily affected by the impact of New Zealand’s logging industry or the increased frequency of nature-minded forest visitors due to tourism.

“On decayed fir, beech, ash, &c.” Cooke 1871 United States)

Occurring on Abies (fir) and Picea (spruce). Gobice 2013. [May refer to alpestre?]

Log in conifer forest. Thind & Khara 1975 (Jammu-Kashmir, India)

As H. caput-medusae:
“on the dead woods” Letellier 1826;
“On trunks of trees” Cooke 1871 (United States);
“On trunks” Massee 1892 & Stevenson 1886 (England).

Abies alba

Abies spp.

Acer spp.

Alnus spp.

Betula alba

Betula papyrifera

Betula spp.

Carpinus spp.

Carya spp.

Fagus orientalis

Fagus spp.

Fagus sylvatica

Fraxinus excelsior

Fraxinus spp.

Morus spp.

Notholithocarpus densifolia

Nyssa sylvatica

Picea glauca

Picea spp.

Populus balsamifera

Populus spp.

Populus tacamahaca

Populus tremula

Populus tremuloides

Populus trichocarpa

Quercus cerris

Quercus dilata

Quercus robur (now = Quercus pedunculata)

Salix spp.

Tilia spp.

Tsuga heterophylla

Ulmus spp.

Abies alba (silver fir) Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (Czechoslovakia, also from Yugoslavia).

Abies sp. (fir) ATCC (Yugoslavia).

Acer (maple) or Fagus (beech) Ginns 1984 (Virginia).

Alnus sp. (alder) was mentioned in Harrison 1973 (Oregon).

Betula alba (silver birch) Ginns 1985 (Sweden).

Betula papyrifera (white birch) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada).

Betula papyrifera (white birch) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as = H. laciniatum).

Betula sp. “rotting” Ginns 1985; also “windfall” Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (Serpukhov District, Russia).

Carpinus (hornbeam) or Fagus (beech) Ginns 1984 (UK).

Carya sp. (hickory) “grows from dead wood” “on a dead hickory” Coker 1918 (North Carolina, USA) (as Manina flagellum).

Fagus orientalis (oriental beech) was mentioned in Doğan et al. 2005 (Turkey) See comments below.

Fagus sp.: “stump” Lacheva 2014 (Bulgaria); also Ginns 1985 (Denmark); also Hallenberg 1983 (Denmark, France, Sweden, Yugoslavia); also Bisko et al. 2016 (Ukraine); also Abrego et al. 2017. Arnold 2001 proposed Hericium coralloides as an indicator species for undisturbed beech forests.

Fagus sylvatica (European beech) ATCC (Denmark); also Stalpers 1992 (Ostrava, Czechoslovakia).

“fallen decayed trunks of Fagus sylvatica and other deciduous trees, and exceptionally on Abies” Hallenberg 1983 (as = H. clathroides). [Noted no reaction with p-cresol.]

Fraxinus excelsior was mentioned at the Global Fungal Red List.

Fraxinus sp. (ash) was mentioned in Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK).

Morus sp. (mulberry) was mentioned in Persoon 1794: 151. “Quercum, etiam ad Fagos et Abietis, et in Italia ex Batarra […], in Ulmis et Moris provenit.”

Notholithocarpus (Lithocarpus) densifolia (tan-oak) Common on dropped limbs, fallen trunks, on dead standing trees, inside hollows (as both growth forms).
Local observation by Trout (Mendocino Co. California, USA).

Nyssa sylvatica (tupelo) “on decayed log” Van Hook 1922 (Indiana, USA) (as Hydnum caput-ursi).

Picea glauca (white spruce) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Picea sp. (spruce) DAVFP (BC, Canada) (as = H. laciniatum and H. ramosum).

Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Populus spp. Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba , Canada).

Populus sp. (poplar) DAVFP (BC, Canada) (as = H. laciniatum and H. ramosum); also Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada).

Populus tacamahaca (black cottonwood) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Populus tremula  (quaking aspen) Ginns 1985 (Sweden).

Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada); also DAVFP (BC, Canada) (as = Hericium laciniatum and Hericium ramosum); also Brambilla & Sutton 1969 (Manitoba, Canada) (as H. laciniatum).

Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) DAVFP (BC, Canada. Most common host species in BC collections.) (as = Hericium laciniatum and H. ramosum) Also Ginns 1985.

Quercus cerris (Turkey oak) “on coarse woody debris” Urban 2015 (Austria).

Quercus dilata (tilonj) “on dead parts of trunk” Sultana & Qreshi 2007 (Pakistan) (as H. ramosum).

Quercus robur (English oak) “on decaying trunk” Ginns 1985 (Sweden).

Salix sp. (willow) Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada).

Tilia sp. mentioned in Russian Red Book Plants (Russian Federation).

Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock) DAVFP (BC, Canada) (as laciniatum & ramosum).

Ulnus spp. (elm) was mentioned in Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK).

“fallen decayed trunks of Fagus” Hallenberg 1983 (Sweden).

“on angiosperm wood” Stalpers 1992 (Epping forest, England).

“Common in Iowa on dead logs of frondose species.” Miller 1935. (Iowa) (as = Hericium laciniatum/coralloides).

“logs on ground. Mostly Beech, also on Fraxinus and Ulnus” Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK).

“Beech wood” Wald et al 2004.

“On beech and hickory logs” Banker 1906 (Canada and USA: NY to CA) (as = Hericium laciniatum/ramosum).

“most commonly on Acer spp., frequent on Fagus and Betula, single collections on Ulmus, Carya, and Fraxinus. It is the only species seen on cottonwood and aspen (Populus spp.) in the west. Single collections on Alnus (Oregon) and live oak (California), and in Alaska on Betula and Populus.” Harrison 1973 (as Hericium ramosum).

“grows on stumps and trunks of dead hardwoods, mainly birch, rarely beech, elm, alder, oak, linden [Tilia sp.], aspen […]” Russian Red Book Plants (Russian Federation).

“fruits from dead hardwood logs and stumps,” “Saprobic and possibly parasitic…typically fruiting from fallen hardwoods branches and stumps, but very rarely reported from the wounds of living hardwoods (perhaps as a result of misidentification);” Kuo website.

“grows only on deciduous wood, usually poplar.” Henderson 1981.

“exclusively on deciduous wood” Harrison 1973 (as H. ramosum).

“decayed log” ATCC (UK).

“hardwood logs” Ostry et al 2011.

“on hardwood logs” Mycoweb (California) (as H. ramosum).

“Grows on prostrate trunks of trees of various kinds.” Hyams 1900 (North Carolina, USA).

H. caput-medusae “on the dead woods”; H. coralloides “on the oldest tree trunks, and mainly on oaks.” Letellier 1826.

“on Fagus orientalis trees” “in conifer forest” “on beech trees” “on oak trees” Doğan et al. 2005  (Turkey).  However, notice in Doğan’s work that coralloides is presented as being synonymous with alpestre, ‘erinaceum’ AND ramosum. In going through his references Doğan appears to also include abietis as a synonym?

Maas Geesteranus 1959 held a similar view in asserting that coralloides was only found on conifers.

Thongbai et al. 2015 also purported coralloides to occur only conifers, probably drawing this from the literature, such as Maas Geesteranus, as they claimed it occurred exclusively on conifers. No reference was included by Thongbai on this particular point.

Listed as being found on Abies and various conifers in Rastetter 1983 (Germany)

It seems sound, where reference material still exists in tissue banks, to suggest a re-evaluation of the European coralloides reported on conifers as possibly alpestre and of the American coralloides reported on conifers as possibly being abietis?

Hericium clathroides

Hericium clathroides
[Given as an accepted species in Index Species Fungorum. Most workers consider this to be a synonym for coralloides. Some (such as Thongbai et alia 2015) reserve clathroides for a New Zealand find that is most often housed in Australian herbariums as coralloides, or some workers (such as Maas Geesteranus) limit coralloides to being a conifer lover, and ignore the existence of hardwood loving coralloides in North America, Asia, Australia and Europe.  Some recognize clathroides AND coralloides. Additional confusions between alpestre and coralloides may also exist.

There appears to be the suggestion of at least two unresolved entities present in all of those continents. It is clear up to several branching Hericium species occur in both the PNW and in the eastern USA. The mess that exists around the name coralloides is so convoluted it is likely to not be resolvable. Despite the hurdles, a real monograph for the genus, based on living materials, would be of great value. Attempts to consider specific names as synonyms across continents are also in need of reevaluation.]

Abies sp. (fir) Tanchaud 2015 (France) (as = H. ramosum).

Betula pendula (white birch) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing Astapenko & Kutafyeva 1990 (Russia). (as = H. clathroides)

Betula, Fagus and Quercus Thongbai et alia 2015 (New Zealand)

Fagus sylvatica (beech) Bisko et alia 2016 (Moldavia, Czech Republic); Stasińska 1999 (NW Poland); “Fallen decayed trunks of Fagus sylvatica and other deciduous trees, and exceptionally on Abies” Hallenberg 1983 (Sweden).

Populus tremula (quaking aspen) Ginns 1985 (Sweden); Cybertruffle’s Robigalia citing  Astapenko 1990:290. (1 record from Russia).

Quercus incane [sic] Karun & Sridhar 2016 citing Thind & Khara 1975 (Himachal Pradesh, India). [This is now Q. leucotrichophora.]

“Galio sylvatici-Carpinetum with Fagus”, “Deschampsio flexuosae-Fagetum (=Fago-Quercetum, Luzulo pilosae-Fagetum)”.
Lisiewska 2006 (Poland) (as = Hericium ramosum).

“ad truncos pineos putridos inventum.” Persoon 1794 (Russia near Ob River).

The host accounts given suggest a re-examination of either identifications or synonyms might be in order. See comments concerning identifications earlier.

Atlas of Living Australia lists: 

39 records from NSW, Australia; many of which were submitted as H. clathroides;

34 records from Queensland, Australia; many submitted as H. clathroides;

56 records from Victoria, Australia; many submitted as H. clathroides;

67 records from New Zealand; the vast majority as Hericium clathroides. (There are 8 additional records as Hericium sp.). 

Hericium cirrhatum

Hericium cirrhatum
[Increasingly accepted name for Creolophus cirrhatus.]

Betula pendula

Fagus spp.

Fraxinus spp.

Populus spp.

Quercus spp.

Salix spp.

Ulmus spp.

“standing trees and fallen branches and logs. Usually beech. Sometimes ash, elm and oak and possibly Betula pendula” [silver birch] Hampshire Biodiversity Partnership 2003 (UK).

“on poplar trees” Doğan et al. 2005 (Turkey).

Quercus sp. trees on “dead wood” Afyon et al. 2005 (Turkey).

Oaks (“Espèce du chêne”) Michel 2007 (France).

Salix sp. “on willow branch”  Doğan & Öztürk 2006 (Karaman, Turkey).

Fagus, Populus, & Quercus were mentioned as hosts in Bisko et al. 2016 (Ukraine).

Fagus & Quercus were mentioned as hosts in Rastetter 1983 (Germany).

 

Hericium botryoides

Hericium botryoides
[Given as accepted species in Index Species Fungorum. Most authorities reject this name. I have not yet located any molecular work.]

Quercus myrsinaefolia (Chinese evergreen oak) “on trunks” Ito & Otani 1957 (Japan).

 

Hericium bharengense

Hericium bharengense
[Given as accepted species in Index Species Fungorum, The description included molecular work.]

Tsuga dumosa, (Himalayan hemlock) on “dead and slightly decomposed log” & “on a decaying log” Das et al. 2011  (Sikkim, India).

 

Hericium americanum

Hericium americanum [Commonly accepted name]

Acer saccharum

Acer spp.

Betula alleghaniensis

Betula papyrifera

Carya ovata

Carya spp.

Fagus grandifolia

Larix laricina

Platanus spp.

Populus spp.

Populus tremuloides

Populus trichocarpa [Questioned]

Quercus garryana [Questioned]

Tsuga heterophylla [Questioned]

Tsuga spp.

Acer saccharum (sugar maple) Ginns 1984 (Ontario, Canada).

Acer spp. (maple) Roger’s mushrooms (Ontario, Canada, under H. ramosum); Morel Mushroom Hunting Club (Georgia, USA) as a form of Hericium coralloides, see www.morelmushroomhunting.com/herricium_coralloides_var_rosea.htm I’m assigning this identity based on its appearance and the pink coloration.

Betula alleghaniensis (yellow birch) Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada); alsodecayed” Betula alleghaniensis ATCC (Canada) and also Ginns 1984 (Ontario, Canada).

Betula papyrifera (white birch) Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada).

Carya ovata (shagbark hickory) and also on Carya sp. log Ginns 1985 (Ontario, Canada).

Fagus grandifolia (American beech) Harrison 1973 (common in Nova Scotia in earlier times following a blight but absent in 1973); also Ginns 1985 (Ontario and Nova Scotia).

Larix laricina (tamarack) Ginns 1985  (Ontario, Canada).

Platanus sp. (plane tree) Ginns 1984 (Pennsylvania).

Populus sp. (aspen) Glaeser & Smith 2013 (Arizona, USA).

Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen) Ginns 1985  (Ontario, Canada).

Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) DAVFP  (BC, Canada). [Due to the collection being reported from BC, this can’t be Hericium americanum. Suspect this may have been a coralloides?]

Quercus garryana (garry oak) DAVFP  (BC, Canada). [Due to the collection being reported from BC, this can’t be Hericium americanum. Suspect this may be a coralloides?]

Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock) DAVFP  (BC, Canada) [Due to the collection being from BC, this can’t be Hericium americanum. Suspect this may have been abietis?]

Tsuga sp. Ginns 1985 and also Stalpers 1992 (New York, USA).

“On beech and hickory logs” Banker 1906 (as H. coralloides).

“old logs, dead stubs, or cankers on living trees with heart rot. It has been reported on Fagus, Acer, Carya and Quercus. Collections usually recorded as occurring on rotting deciduous logs. In Michigan, most commonly reported on Acer spp., but Fagus is the most common host over its entire range. Populus has been considered a common substrate, but oddly enough, there are no collections on this host in the University of Michigan Herbarium. The species is limited in North America to east of the Great Plains, and north of North Carolina and Tennessee.” 
  Harrison 1973 (as Hericium coralloides).
[Carya is hickory which some commercial growers report won’t support Hericium growth in culture.]

“Saprobic and possibly parasitic; […] fruiting on dead hardwood logs and stumps, or from the wounds of living hardwoods; documented to fruit (rarely) on conifer wood;” Kuo website.

“growing on hardwoods” “on wood of hardwoods and conifers” Henderson 1981.

“white rot on the logs and standing trunks of hardwoods and conifers” Glaeser & Smith 2013 citing Binion et al. 2008. The reference to conifers may have involved confusion with abietis?

In our cultivation of this species, Hericium americanum did great on tan-oak sawdust media but would not grow at all on maple.

Sound complaints were voiced by a number of workers concerning the problem involved with the force fitting of a “coralloides” with larger spores, as occurs in the USA and Canada, into the taxa Hericium coralloides. This was resolved with Ginns renaming that strictly North American material (limited to east of the Rocky Mountains) to Hericium americanum.

 

Hericium alpestre

Hericium alpestre

[Commonly accepted name but increasing dropped.]

Abies alba

Abies spp.

Abies alba (silver fir) Ginns 1984 (Austria). Ginns comments that H. alpestre is restricted to central and southern Europe and occurs almost entirely on Abies alba (citing Hallenberg 1983); Also in Ginns 1985 (Austria); “growing in the mountains of Central and South Europe […] grows almost solely on Abies, in Europe mostly A. alba (Nuss [Nuß] 1973). It has not been found in the Nordic countries.” Koski-Kotiranta & Niemelä 1988.

Abies sp. (fir) ATCC; Stalpers 1992 (near Ostrava & also Bohemia, Czechoslovakia); also pastedGraphic.pngVarstvo gozdov (Slovakia); “[…] almost exclusively been found on newly fallen trunks and on stumps of Abies in the mountains of C and S Europe” Hallenberg 1983. (Austria); Dead tree. Merino Alcántara 2011 (Alpes-Maritimes, Alpes-Côte d’Azur, France); Also mentioned in Bisko et alia 2016 (Ukraine) who presented alpestre as a form of abietis; Abies was also given in Persoon 1794:151.

Fagus orientalis (oriental beech) Cybertruffle’s Robigalia (unclear if Georgia or Ukraine). [as = H. alpestre forma caput-ursi]

On “conifers and especially on Abies”. Tanchaud 2015 (France) (as H. flagellum).

“des vieux pins & des sapins” (“old pines and fir”) Paulet 1793:427. 

See comments earlier on the various points of confusion involving the divergent views of alpestre, clathroides, coralloides and flagellum.

(wrt European collections:)

Hallenberg 1983 reported Hericium alpestre to react with p-cresol.

Hallenberg 1983 reported that Hericium coralloides had no reaction with p-cresol.

sp. (fir) ATCC; Stalpers 1992 (near Ostrava & also Bohemia, Czechoslovakia); also Varstvo gozdov (Slovakia); “[…] almost exclusively been found on newly fallen trunks and on stumps of Abies in the mountains of C and S Europe” Hallenberg 1983. (Austria); Dead tree. Merino Alcántara 2011 (Alpes-Maritimes, Alpes-Côte d’Azur, France); Also mentioned in Bisko et al. 2016 (Ukraine) who presented alpestre as a form of abietis; Abies was also given in Persoon 1794: 151.

Hallenberg 1983 reported this species to react with p-cresol.

Hericium abietis

Hericium abietis

[Commonly accepted name]

Abies amabilis

Abies grandis

Abies lasiocarpa

Abies procera

Abies sp.

Picea engelmannii

Picea sitchensis

Pseudotsuga menziesii

Tsuga heterophylla 

Tsuga mertensiana

Abies amabilis (Pacific silver fir) decay in tree Ginns 1985; also Allen et alia 1996 (BC, Canada).

Abies grandis (grand fir) ATCC (Canada) also decay in tree Ginns 1985 (BC, Canada).

Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock) dead tree, decay, broken tree, windfall. Ginns 1985 (BC, Canada).

Abies, Pseudotsuga (douglas-fir) and Tsuga were mentioned in Hallenberg et alia 2013.

“[…] causes a typical “white pocket rot” of Abies grandis (Dougl.) Lindl. [grand fir], A. lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt. [subalpine fir], A. procera Rend. [noble fir], Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm. [Engelmann spruce], Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. [western hemlock], Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco [douglas-fir] in the Pacific Northwest. In Canada, it was reported from British Columbia by Bier (1949) as […] causing a “long pitted trunk rot” of western hemlock and true fir.
Foster and Foster (1951) […] as a cause of a rot of western hemlock. In Alaska, Hydnum abietis was reported by Englerth (1947) as the cause of a serious rot of western hemlock, and in one instance of a rot of Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr [sitka spruce].
 All material that has been examined from California, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington has been on conifers.”
Harrison 1973.

“causes a butt and trunk rot of amabilis [Abies amabilis], grand [Abies grandis], and subalpine fir [Abies lasiocarpa], mountain [Tsuga mertensiana] and western hemlock [Tsuga heterophylla], and occasionally Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis]. […] “also been found on Douglas-fir and Engelmann spruce.” Allen et alia 1996 (BC, Canada).

“decayed conifer” ATCC (Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada).

“growing on conifers” Henderson 1981 (Pacific NW).

“on conifer stumps or logs” Kuo website & also mykoweb.com.

DAVP identified the following as substrates reported for collections made in BC: Abies amabilis (2), Abies grandis (2), Abies sp. (4), Picea engelmannii (1), Picea sitchensis (1), Pseudotsuga menziesii (2), Tsuga heterophylla (25), Tsuga mertensiana (1) and on unidentified dead wood (4)Hericium abietis

comments and questions.

“Hericium abietis is restricted to western North America from northern California to southeast Alaska. It grows saprophytically on fallen or standing dead conifers, especially Abies spp.Molina et alia 1993. See also Harrison 1973.

This species name should not be confused with a much older but similar sounding name abietinum which was applied to something occurring in Europe.

Occurrences for abietis have been reported outside of that range.

Examples:

“on buried conifer wood” Kaya 2009 (Turkey) 

The species identification would seem to be in error due to the country. The account of Kaya 2009 may have referred to alpestre?

Hericium abietis was said to have been collected in the Ukraine on an Abies sp. in Bisko et alia 2016. 

Both collections seem more likely to be a misidentification of H. alpestre or another taxa? 

DAVP lists a collection of Hericium americanum from Tsuga heterophylla; also listing two Hericium coralloides, one of them from a Picea species and another from Tsuga heterophylla. All three occurred in British Columbia so all of those are plausibly Hericium abietis.

ricium abietis
[Commonly accepted name]

Abies amabilis

Abies grandis

Abies lasiocarpa

Abies procera

Picea engelmannii

Picea sitchensis

Pseudotsuga menziesii

Tsuga heterophylla

Tsuga mertensiana

Abies amabilis (Pacific silver fir) decay in tree Ginns 1985; also Allen et al. 1996 (BC, Canada).

Abies grandis (grand fir) ATCC (Canada) also decay in tree  Ginns 1985 (BC, Canada).

Tsuga heterophylla (western hemlock) dead tree, decay, broken tree, windfall. Ginns 1985 (BC, Canada).

Abies, Pseudotsuga (douglas-fir) and Tsuga were mentioned in Hallenberg et al. 2013.

Abies sp. listed in Bisko et al. 2016 (Ukraine). [MisID of H. alpestre?]

“[…] causes a typical “white pocket rot” of Abies grandis (Dougl.) Lindl. [grand fir], A. lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt. [subalpine fir], A. procera Rend. [noble fir], Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm. [Engelmann spruce], Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. [western hemlock], Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco [douglas-fir] in the Pacific Northwest. In Canada, it was reported from British Columbia by Bier (1949) as […] causing a “long pitted trunk rot” of western hemlock and true fir.
Foster and Foster (1951) […] as a cause of a rot of western hemlock. In Alaska, Hydnum abietis was reported by Englerth (1947) as the cause of a serious rot of western hemlock, and in one instance of a rot of Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr [sitka spruce].
All material that has been examined from California, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington has been on conifers.”
Harrison 1973.

“causes a butt and trunk rot of amabilis [Abies amabilis], grand [Abies grandis], and subalpine fir [Abies lasiocarpa], mountain [Tsuga mertensiana] and western hemlock [Tsuga heterophylla], and occasionally Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis].” Allen et al. 1996 (BC, Canada).

“decayed conifer” ATCC (Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada).

“growing on conifers” Henderson 1981 (Pacific NW).

“on conifer stumps or logs” Kuo website & also mykoweb.com.

“on buried conifer wood” Kaya 2009 (Turkey) [This ID is clearly in error.]

It is important not to confuse this species name (abietis occurs only in northwestern North America) with a much older but similar name abietinum which was applied to something occurring in Europe.
  The account of Kaya 2009 may have referred to either alpestre or coralloides?

This species is also listed in Bisko et al. 2016 as being collected in the Ukraine.

New fruit

Oz culture (shown 18 September 2016).

hericium

hericium

hericium

hericium

More are in the fruiting rotation but this one was used to obtain a spore print (hence the bruising).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Culture jar

Nothing new or original from me here as far as the use of filter disks on jars or using jars for agar.

This is something that has been a valuable tool in maintaining and growing Hericium clones.

filters and jar lids

filters and jar lids

IMGP8451

Holes were made using an art crafter’s thin-metal hole-punch and installed with the side shown facing down so heating does not seal the edge shut.

IMGP8452

Standard heavy filter material as is used in the fungal production industry.

It is some sort of thick porous plastic that holds up to pressure cooking. Looks and feels like it could be polypropylene but I am not sure. Comes in sheets that are most often sold in precut circles. There is some art stock that looks very similar but if held to the light tiny specks of sky are visible through it so it is not the same thing.

IMGP8455

Agar that has been shaken cold and quickly poured.

(These could have been poured using hot agar but this is way faster and simpler.)
This was a PDYA so required a lot of swirling during the pouring process and still had a fair amount of excess settling in the last jar.
Used:
18 grams Uncle Ben’s Instant Potato Flakes
14 grams of bacteriological grade agar
3 grams of dextrose
1 gram of Diamond-V yeast extract (Don’t mistake dark spots as contaminants later!)
750 ml water (tap water which is nonchlorinated from a protected well)

IMGP8456Filter lid jar ready to cook

cold agar shaken and quickly poured - with lid

with lid

cold agar shaken and quickly poured - ready to pressure cook

with foil ready to pressure cook

cold agar ready to pressure cook

cold agar ready to pressure cook

Metal foil just keeps filter disk from getting saturated and potentially compromisable.,

cold agar ready to pressure cook

cold agar ready to pressure cook

These  get stacked in the PC and cooked for 25 minutes at 15 psi.

cooked agar jars cooling down

cooked agar jars cooling down

A cooked bag straight out of the PC can be seen on the left.

cooked agar jars cooling down

cooked agar jars cooling down

Jar on far left above shows settling due to setttling challenge when starting with cold agar. It has never caused problems and generally only affects the last jar poured.

cooked agar jar

cooked agar jar

cooked agar jar

cooked agar jar

cooked agar jar ready to inoculate

cooked agar jar ready to inoculate

This is a rather high priced way to make agar plates compared to petri dishes.

For long-lived cultures like Hericium they can be quite valuable as the thick agar lasts longer before drying. And there is enough room to prevent breaching the container if the Hericium forms microfruit.

Plus these can go straight into a refrigerator and enjoy Winter even if it is the dead of summer. This is how we keep our working cultures alive and happy during summer heat (we also maintain master slants).

They have also proven to be a good tool when cloning Hericiums but the tissue selection is the most important aspect. If it is not both clean and not-at-all waterlogged another choice should be made if possible. It is feasible to get clones from soggy material but they typically require a lot of time and effort to chase clear of molds and other contaminants. This problem is dramatically reduced or eliminated when starting out with a good tissue sample. Inside of thick sections of branches or inside of the basal sections have given great results as have the use of branchy tips from microfruit forming inside of jars or when fruiting has occurred inside of a bag.